Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893)

Jean-Martin Charcot was an eminent 19th century French neurologist who worked at the Salpêtriere hospital, Paris (9). Without doubt, Charcot was one of the most important characters in the history of MS, his findings representing a huge breakthrough for the clinical understanding of the disease.

Charcot was the first to make definite links between the hitherto mysterious symptomatology, now known to be MS, and the pathological changes seen in post-mortem samples. For the first time, almost forty years after the discovery of the lesions, the clinical condition was described by Charcot as 'sclrérose en plaques' and MS as recognised as a distinct disease entity (10).

Charcot's contribution extended to the development of diagnostic criteria, which included the now famous Charcot's triad, diplopia (double vision), ataxia (disturbances of balance or co-ordination) and dysarthria (difficulties with, or slurred speech) which he observed in his own housekeeper.

Charcot also gave the first complete histological account of MS lesions, describing many important features including loss of myelin and proliferation of glial fibres and nuclei.

==> Pierre Marie (1853-1940)

Latest News

More news

What's hot

Kiss_what_hot

Kiss Goodbye to MS...

is a campaign about hope, that together we can raise funds to accelerate Irish and global research into MS and continue to provide services to over 9000 people living with MS In Ireland. Join the campaign NOW!

Find out more

Events Calendar

» Our next Event

25 May 2019: Physio led exercise classes for people with MS, starts 12th January (ongoing) please contact Una Goan.

View all events

eNEWS SIGNUP

If you'd like to receive e-news updates from The Society please enter your email address below. If you want to know more about how we manage personal data then please see our privacy policy.

My local MSI

Map of MS Ireland's service areas South Mid West West Midlands South East North East North West North Dublin City and Fingal South West Dublin and Kildare South East Dublin and Wicklow